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Listen, Talk, Answer — Support Your Child’s Learning

Listen, Talk, Answer — Support Your Child’s Learning

Most children come home every day with stories to share. Do you stop what you are doing and listen carefully? Your child probably asks a lot of questions. Do you try to answer them? If you do, then you already know the benefits of giving your child time and attention....

Tips for Spending Quality Time With Your Child

Tips for Spending Quality Time With Your Child

Let’s face it—life is busy! Between work and life responsibilities, the days pass us by in the blink of an eye. Many parents worry that they don’t spend enough time with their children, wondering if this will lead to developmental delays. Some parents feel guilty...

Conversations with Children: Tips for Using Words in Powerful Ways

Conversations with Children: Tips for Using Words in Powerful Ways

The power of the words we use with children is like no other! Much research has been done on the lasting effect our words have on children: we all know someone who still remembers something a parent, grandparent, sibling, or teacher said years ago that still feels...

Why it’s important to read aloud with your kids, and how to make it count

Why it’s important to read aloud with your kids, and how to make it count

One of the most important things parents can do, beyond keeping kids healthy and safe, is to read with them. That means starting when they are newborns and not even able to talk, and continuing well beyond the years that they can read by themselves. Study after study shows that early reading with children helps them learn to speak, interact, bond with parents and read early themselves, and reading with kids who already know how to read helps them feel close to caretakers, understand the world around them and be empathetic citizens of the world.

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Let The Children Play

Let The Children Play

“Research has found that early didactic instruction might actually worsen academic performance,” states David Kohn in his New York Times article, “Let the Kids Learn Through Play.” He goes on to say that, “Rebecca A. Marcon, a psychology professor at the University of North Florida, studied 343 children who had attended a preschool class that was ‘academically oriented,’ one that encouraged ‘child initiated’ learning, or one in between. Children’s progress ‘may have been slowed by overly academic preschool experiences that introduced formalized learning experiences too early for most children’s developmental status,’ Dr. Marcon wrote.